Wings of love: Or what drives the bird watchers to birds!

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Colourful plumages, gleaming feathers, amazing flight patterns, mating calls or chirpy songs – there are many reasons why bird watchers go birding.

Some do it as the last straw in their lives. For instance, Phoebe Snetsinger, a legend among bird watchers, took to birding when she was diagnosed with terminal melanoma in 1981 and had only a year to live. She went around the globe observing birds and set a world record of 8,398 species before her death. Incidentally, she went on to live for 18 years, before her death in a car accident in Madagascar in 1991.

Others, do it for pretty normal yet fascinating experiences.

For many, it’s the simple aesthetic pleasure of soaking in the grace and beauty of birds.

A lot of them see birds as symbol of freedom, not just in flight, but as a carefree way to make a living and to make use of resources at hand. Watch a bird building its nest and you will know what we are talking about.

Many find the added advantage of discovering other flora and fauna in the wild as a lot of birds simply flock there.

One can become a bird watcher even in our urban homes. Just look out of the window or go to a garden nearby. Of course, rapid urbanisation is making it difficult for birds to coexist with human beings. The common sparrow or the noisy crows are hardly spotted in the cities.

Since birds are an indicator to environmental health too, it’s time we allowed the bird lover in each one of us to appreciate these wonderful creatures. Especially if we enable our younger generation to watch nature live it, can sensitise them to life around them and give them a great reason to get rid of the screens that they are always glued too.

The North India Birding Tour provides everyone an opportunity to spot fascinating birds across Himalayas and plains, not to mention the other marvels of nature, too.

So what’s your excuse for not going birding?